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Windows Server

Windows Home Server 2011 : Controlling Services (part 1) - Controlling Services with the Services Snap-In

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System services are background routines that enable the system to perform tasks such as logging on to the network, managing disks, collecting performance data, and writing event logs. Windows Home Server comes with more than 100 installed services. Services usually operate behind the scenes. However, you may need to pause, stop, and start services, as well as configure the way a service loads at startup. The next few sections show you the various methods you can use to control services.

1. Controlling Services with the Services Snap-In

The standard interface for the Windows Home Server services is the Services snap-in, which you can load by using either of the following techniques:

  • Select Start, Administrative Tools, Services.

  • Select Start, Run to open the Run dialog box, type services.msc, and click OK.

The Services snap-in that appears displays a list of the installed services, and for each service, it displays the name of the service and a brief description, the current status of the service (Started, Paused, or blank for a stopped service), the service’s startup type (such as Automatic or Manual), and the name of the system account that the service uses to log on at startup. When you select a service, the Extended tab of the taskpad view shows the service name and description and offers links to control the service status (such as Start, Stop, or Restart). Figure 1 shows an example.

Figure 1. You can use the Services snap-in to control the Windows Home Server services.

To change the status of a service, select it and then use one of the following techniques:

  • To start a stopped service, either click the Start link in the taskpad or click the Start Service toolbar button.

  • To stop a running service, either click the Stop link in the taskpad or click the Stop Service toolbar button.

  • To pause a running service, either click the Pause link in the taskpad or click the Start Service toolbar button. (Note that only a few services support the Pause task.)

  • To resume a paused service, either click the Restart link in the taskpad or click the Restart Service toolbar button.

Note

If a service is started but it has no Stop link and the Stop toolbar button is disabled, it means the service is essential to Windows Home Server and can’t be stopped. Examples of essential services include Plug and Play, Remote Procedure Call (RPC), and Security Accounts Manager.


Caution

It’s possible that a service might be dependent on one or more other services, and if those services aren’t running, the dependent service will not work properly. If you stop a service that has dependent services, Windows Home Server also stops the dependents. However, when you restart the main service, Windows Home Server may not start the dependent services as well. You need to start those services by hand. To see which services depend on a particular service, double-click that service to open its property sheet, and then display the Dependencies tab. Dependent services are shown in the field under The Following System Components Depend on This Service. The field is grayed out if no dependencies exist.


To change the way a service starts when you boot Windows Home Server, follow these steps:

1.
Double-click the service you want to work with to open its property sheet. Figure 2 shows an example.

Figure 2. You use a service’s property sheet to control its startup type.


2.
Use the Startup Type list to select one of the following types:

AutomaticThe service starts automatically when Windows Home Server boots. The service is started before the Welcome to Windows dialog box appears.
Automatic (Delayed Start)The service starts automatically when Windows Home Server boots. The service does not start until you log on.
ManualThe service does not start when Windows Home Server boots. You must start the service yourself.
DisabledThe service does not start when Windows Home Server boots, and you can’t start the service manually.

3.
Click OK.

Note

If the Startup Type list is disabled, it means the service is essential to Windows Home Server and must be started automatically when the system boots.


Note

All the services that Windows Home Server requires to perform its core functions use the Automatic startup type. This explains how Windows Home Server can run on a headless device. When you turn on the headless device, the “boot” only goes as far as the Welcome to Windows prompt. However, all the essential services are started by that point, so Windows Home Server can perform its core duties without the need for a local logon.


Tip

If you make changes to service startup types and you find that your system is unstable or causing problems, the best thing to do is return each service to its default startup type. If you’re not sure of the default for a service, open the Services snap-in, select Help, Help Topics, and then select the Services, Concepts, Default Settings for Services branch.

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