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Windows 10 : System Maintenance and Performance - Using Windows Troubleshooters
Windows includes a number of troubleshooters to help solve problems with your system. Here’s how to use a troubleshooter to fix an audio playback problem. In this example, the speakers were muted.
Windows 10 : System Maintenance and Performance - Checking Drives for Errors with This PC
You can check a drive for errors at any time using This PC.
Windows 10 : System Maintenance and Performance - Checking Drives for Errors When Connected
As drives are connected to your system, Windows watches for errors. If an error is detected, Notifications displays a message
Windows 10 : System Maintenance and Performance - Viewing Disk Information
Use the This PC view in File Explorer for answers to these and other questions about the drives built in to and connected to your computer.
Windows 10 : System Maintenance and Performance - Selecting a Power Scheme
With laptops, desktops, and all-in-one devices, you can select a power scheme in Windows that will stretch battery life as far as possible or keep your system running at top speed all the time.
Windows 10 : System Maintenance and Performance - Checking Charge Level
If you use a device that runs on battery power, you can quickly check its charge level from the Windows taskbar.
Windows 10 : How to Customize the Right Side (part 3) - Eliminate all tiles
Of course, once you’ve done that, you’ve just eliminated one of the most useful ways of opening things on your PC. Now you can open apps only from the left side or the taskbar.
Windows 10 : How to Customize the Right Side (part 2) - Group your tiles
By the way: Whenever you point to (or tap) the heading of any group, you may notice a little “grip strip” at the right side.
Windows 10 : How to Customize the Right Side (part 1) - Resize a tile
Tiles come in four sizes: three square sizes and one rectangle. As part of your Start menu interior decoration binge, you may want to make some of them bigger and some of them smaller.
Windows Vista : Working with Windows Deployment Services (part 2) - Deploying an Install image, Automating the installation of an Install image
You may also use the Windows Deployment Services (WDS) Application Programming Interface (API) to develop you own solutions based on WDS. The API is offered for Server and Client functions, but not for WDS management components.
Windows Vista : Working with Windows Deployment Services (part 1) - Creating a Capture image, Creating a Custom Install image
When working with Microsoft Virtual PC 2007, you must make sure the focus is set to the boot window for the virtual machine, then hold down the DEL key during the startup process to enter the BIOS Setup Utility. From here, you can go to the boot menu and change the Boot Priority to move PXE to the top of the list.
Windows Vista : Installing Windows Deployment Services (part 2) - Configuring Windows Deployment Services
This section highlights some potential configuration issues and then covers the use of the Windows Deployment Services Configuration Wizard to establish a basic configuration and progresses through providing images and finally configuring the Boot Menu.
Windows Vista : Installing Windows Deployment Services (part 1) - Satisfying prerequisites, Setting up Windows Deployment Services for Server 2003
In addition to the prerequisites listed earlier, when installing on Windows Server 2003 it is also necessary to have RIS installed before you begin. It need not be configured, but it must be installed. The steps that you need to take depend upon the service pack level of your Windows Server 2003 system.
Windows Vista : Introducing Windows Deployment Services
Windows Deployment Services (WDS) replaces the previously named Remote Installation Services (RIS). It is included by default in the upcoming Windows Server 2008, and the functionality can be added to Windows Server 2003 with the Windows Automated Installation Kit (WAIK).
Windows 8 : Applications - Snapping
If you have multiple applications open in the tile-based interface and on the Desktop, you will want to explore a feature in Windows 8 called snapping. Snapping is a convenient way to switch applications and view content in one application while working in another. Here’s how it works.
Windows 8 : Applications - The Run Dialog Box, Closing a Program
The Run dialog box has been around since Windows 95. Think of it as a graphical representation of the Run command, which is a single-line command processor.
Windows 8 : Applications - Switching Apps
When you work in the tile-based interface, you work on one application at a time. If you switch applications in the tile-based interface, Windows puts the program to sleep. You don’t need to close an application to open another one in the tile-based interface, provided you have enough memory in your device.
Keeping Windows 7 and Other Software Up to Date : Updating Drivers
Keeping your system up to date also means that device drivers need to be kept up to date. Updated drivers allow your devices to work properly and will maximize compatibility. In Windows 7, updating hardware drivers is made simple and easy. Microsoft has greatly improved automatic driver selection in Windows 7 to be more accurate, to avoid the prompts plaguing past Windows versions, and to work even when a user isn’t logged on.
Keeping Windows 7 and Other Software Up to Date : Windows Update
Windows Update is an important built-in online tool that ensures your system gets all the latest software additions and bug fixes. Unlike the Windows Update version in Windows XP, Windows 7 supplies users an integrated update system that does not require the user to go to the Microsoft update website. Instead of opening a web browser, the new version of Windows Update opens in the same existing window.
Windows 7 : Installing and Replacing Hardware - Upgrading Hardware in the Same Box and Complying with EULA
In the original version of Windows Vista, SPP worked this way: The hardware in your system was recorded when you activated Windows, as already mentioned. If you changed too many items (most notably, your motherboard and hard disk drive), system functionality was slowly reduced.
Windows 7 : Installing and Replacing Hardware - Installing a UPS
Although Windows 7 contains a backup utility you can use to protect your data, and you may use a network drive that’s backed up every night for your data, or a mirror drive, blackouts and power outages (and the data loss they cause) can happen anywhere, any time. In addition to regular backups, in mission-critical settings, you should be concerned about keeping power going to your PC during its normal operation.
Windows 7 : Creating a Windows Network - Joining a Windows Domain Network, Checking Out the Neighborhood, Bridging Two Network Types
Windows 7 provides the capability to connect or bridge two different network types through software. This can eliminate the need to buy a hardware device to connect two disparate networks.
Windows 8 : Troubleshooting and Testing Network Settings
Windows 8 includes many tools for troubleshooting and testing TCP/IP connectivity. The following sections look at automated diagnostics, basic tests that you should perform whenever you install or modify a computer’s network settings, and techniques for resolving difficult networking problems involving DHCP and DNS.
Windows 8 : Managing Network Connections
Network connections enable computers to access resources on the network and the Internet. One network connection is created automatically for each network adapter installed on a computer. This section examines techniques that you can use to manage these connections.
Windows 7 : Configuring a Peer-to-Peer Network (part 3) - Setting Up a Homegroup
Windows 7 has a new networking feature called HomeGroup that can make sharing files, folders, printers, and music/video media very easy. What a homegroup does is let each user decide whether or not to share specific categories of documents, music, video, printers, and so on, or even specific folders and files.
Windows 7 : Configuring a Peer-to-Peer Network (part 2)
When you connect to a new network for the first time, Windows 7 will prompt you to choose a network location. The type of location you select determines the Windows Firewall settings that are applied and the networking features that will be available.
Windows 7 : Configuring a Peer-to-Peer Network (part 1) - Configuring the TCP/IP Protocol
After your network adapters are all installed—and, if you’re using a wired network, cabled together—you need to ensure that each computer is assigned an IP address. This is a number that uniquely identifies each computer on the network
Windows 7 : Creating a Windows Network - Installing a Wireless Network (part 2) - Setting Up a New Wireless Network
If you’re setting up a new wireless network using a wireless router or access point, the hardest part of the job is setting up security and Internet access settings in the router itself.
Windows 7 : Creating a Windows Network - Installing a Wireless Network (part 1) - Wireless Network Setup Choices
Windows 7, Vista, and XP with Service Pack 3 all have built-in support for WPA2. If your router doesn’t support WPA2 or WPA, you might be able to install updated firmware to get it.
Windows 8 : Configuring Network Connections (part 2) - Configuring DNS Resolution, Configuring WINS Resolution
You use WINS to resolve NetBIOS computer names to IPv4 addresses. You also can use WINS to help computers on a network determine the address of other computers on the network. If a WINS server is installed on the network, you can use the server to resolve computer names.
 
 
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