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SQL Server
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SQL Server 2008: Security and User Administration - Managing Permissions
Database security is mainly about managing permissions. Permissions are the security mechanisms that tie principals (for example, logins) to securables (for example, tables). With SQL Server 2008, permissions can be applied at a granular level that provides a great deal of flexibility and control.
SQL Server 2008: Security and User Administration - Managing SQL Server Logins
You can create and administer logins easily using SSMS. You can use T-SQL as well, but the GUI screens are often the best choice. The GUI screens present the configurable properties for a login, including the available options, databases, and securables that can be assigned to a login
Managing SQL Server Permissions (part 4) - Using T-SQL to Manage Permissions
As you saw in the SSMS Permissions pages, three options exist for assigning every permission: GRANT, DENY, and REVOKE. Each option has its own T-SQL statements that can be used to manage permissions as well.
Managing SQL Server Permissions (part 2) - Using SSMS to Manage Permissions at the Object Level
The last permission assignment we look at is the object level. SSMS enables you to select a specific object instance in the Object Explorer and assign permissions to it. This method allows you to navigate to the object you want via the Object Explorer tree and assign permissions accordingly.
Managing SQL Server Permissions (part 2) - Using SSMS to Manage Permissions at the Database Level
The same type of hierarchy exists with permissions at the database level as at the server level. You can apply permissions at a high level to affect many objects of a particular type, or you can apply them on a specific object.
Managing SQL Server Permissions (part 1) - Using SSMS to Manage Permissions at the Server Level
You can use T-SQL or the visual tools available in SSMS to manage permissions. Based on the number of available permissions and their complexity, it is recommended that you use the SSMS tools.
Central Management Servers (part 4) - Evaluating Policies
You can evaluate policies against registered servers or an entire server group using central management servers. The great thing about evaluating policies against multiple servers is that you can simply click a check box to apply the necessary changes to the noncompliant servers.
Central Management Servers (part 3) - Configuring Multi-Server Query Options
Multi-server query results have three configurable options. Adding the server name to the results is one of them, and you've seen that option already in Figure 6. The complete list of options is as follows
Central Management Servers (part 2) - Running Multi-Server Queries
One of the appealing new features in SQL Server 2008 is the ability to execute a single query against multiple servers. This can save many hours of mundane work during your career as a DBA.
Central Management Servers (part 1) - Creating a Central Management Server
Central management servers are new in SQL Server 2008 and are the hub of multi-server administration. Central management servers provide you with a central location to execute multi-server queries and evaluate policies against defined server groups.
SQL Server 2008 : The sqlcmd Command-Line Utility
The sqlcmd command-line utility is the next generation of the isql and osql utilities that you may have used in prior versions of SQL Server. It provides the same type of functionality as isql and osql, including the capability to connect to SQL Server from the command prompt and execute T-SQL commands.
Installing SQL Server 2008 Using a Configuration File
If you need to install SQL Server 2008 to multiple machines, you’ll likely want to do so without having to manually select the same options over and over. Running the installer using a configuration file provides this much-needed timesaving feature.
SQL Server 2008 : Slipstream Installations
With the release of SQL Server 2008 SP1, Microsoft provides the capability to create Slipstream installations of SQL Server 2008. Slipstreaming is a method of integrating a SQL Server 2008 update with the original installation media so that the original media and update are installed at the same time.
SQL Server Programmability Objects
A set of objects stored within a database are of particular interest to a database developer. These objects allow coders to add their own capabilities and functionality to a database.
SQL Server 2005 : Data Querying and Reporting (part 2)
In some cases, you don’t want to run a query against all the data in a table. In such a situation, you can use the new TABLESAMPLE clause to limit the number of rows that any query processes.
SQL Server 2005 : Data Querying and Reporting (part 1)
After data is in a database, it is likely to need to be accessed, changed, and reported on. To perform these basic operations, you need to apply the programming constructs of SQL, specifically Microsoft’s implementation, referred to as Transact-SQL (T-SQL).
Configuring SQL Server 2008 : Instances vs Default Instance
A SQL Server installation is referred to as an instance. Up to and including SQL Server 7.0, only one installation of SQL Server was possible on a server, but that restriction didn’t suit a number of deployment scenarios that customers required, including high-availability and consolidation.
sp_configure and SQL Server Management Studio
sp_configure provides far more configuration options than the Management Studio interface, and you will need to be familiar with it for the exam. Because of this, we’re going to focus on sp_configure and its options, highlighting where a particular option is also available in Management Studio.
Configuring SQL Server 2008 : Database Mail
Database Mail is a solution that enables you to send email messages from SQL Server. It is disabled by default and uses the SMTP standard to deliver messages, so there is no need to have a MAPI client such as Outlook installed on the server.
Configuring SQL Server 2008 : Full-Text Indexing
Full-text indexing is a feature of SQL Server 2008 that allows you to carry out sophisticated searches of text-based data called a full-text search. A full-text search is different from a normal search of data through a normal index because it enables you to use linguistic-based searches
SQL Server 2008 : Working with Indexes
An index is a lookup structure created on a table to optimize, sort, and query performance. Indexes are created on a particular column or columns and store the data values for this column or columns in order
SQL Server 2008 : Working with Constraints
Constraints are data validation rules that are bound to a column or a set of columns in a table. Constraints can also be used to enforce a relationship between two entities represented as two tables
SQL Server 2008 : Working with Tables and Views
Tables are the database objects that store data in a SQL Server database. Tables are structured as columns and rows, like a spreadsheet. The columns define the type and length of data they can store.
SQL Server 2008 : Viewing and Modifying Data (part 3) - Creating Functions and Creating Triggers
Functions, like stored procedures, are saved Transact-SQL statements. Unlike stored procedures, functions cannot perform actions by executing DML statements.
SQL Server 2008 : Viewing and Modifying Data (part 2) - Creating Stored Procedures
Stored procedures are Transact-SQL statements that perform one or more actions and are saved in the database with a name. Stored procedures, used widely to encapsulate the logic of your database system, can accept parameters and return values.
SQL Server 2008 : Viewing and Modifying Data (part 1) - Creating Views
A view is a database object that represents a saved SELECT statement and is also referred to as a virtual or logical table. Views can be queried in the same way as tables, and some types of views can be updated, too.
 
 
 
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