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Exchange Server 2003 : Creating and Managing Address Lists and Recipient Policies (part 1) - Creating and Modifying Address Lists
Address lists are a convenient way of filtering the GAL into more manageable groupings. Address lists are different from distribution groups in that there is no “membership” in an address list like there is in a group.
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003: Configuring Information Stores (part 2) - Moving Exchange Server 2003 Storage Groups and Databases
You had the option to accept the recommendations, to override them by choosing the locations yourself, or to do nothing at all. Performance Optimizer is not included with Exchange Server 2003, but you can still move databases.
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003: Configuring Information Stores (part 1) - Adding Storage Groups and Databases
When Windows 7 synchronizes your offline files, it might find that a file has changed both on the network share and on your offline computer. In that case, the Sync Center icon displays a Sync Conflicts Have Occurred message
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003: Configuring Recipient Objects (part 9) - Managing Mail-Enabled Groups
Mail-enabled groups are typically Active Directory security and distribution groups that have been assigned an e-mail address, and when mail is sent to the group address, it is routed automatically to each member of the group
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003: Configuring Recipient Objects (part 8) - Moving Mailboxes with the Microsoft Exchange Mailbox Merge Wizard
The Exchange Task Wizard is useful for moving a small number of mailboxes within the same organization, but it isn’t designed to move mailboxes in bulk or to move mailboxes across Exchange organizations.
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003: Configuring Recipient Objects (part 7) - Moving Mailboxes with the Exchange Task Wizard
If you need to move only a few mailboxes within the same organization, you can use the Exchange Task Wizard and choose the Move Mailbox option, which will open the Move Mailbox page
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003: Configuring Recipient Objects (part 6) - Configuring Mailbox Permissions
While a mailbox is typically assigned only to the specific person using it, there are times when there is a legitimate business need to grant other people permissions to the mailbox.
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003: Configuring Recipient Objects (part 5) - Configuring Storage Limits with Mailbox Store Policies
Configuring storage limits at the mailbox store level simplifies Exchange administration in that you do not have to configure limits for every individual mailbox
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003: Configuring Recipient Objects (part 4) - Configuring Storage Limits for Individual Mailboxes
You configure storage limits for individual mailboxes using the properties of the user account in the Active Directory Users And Computers console.
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003: Configuring Recipient Objects (part 3)
As an Exchange administrator, you will create mailboxes that are designed for a specific purpose but that are not intended to be used by internal employees, such as a mailbox to receive notifications from your antivirus software.
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003: Configuring Recipient Objects (part 2) - Managing Mailboxes
Once you’ve created an Exchange organization of mailbox-enabled users, there are a number of administrative tasks you might undertake as you manage the organization. Some of the common Exchange tasks related to mailbox management are
Microsoft Exchange Server 2003: Configuring Recipient Objects (part 1) - Recipient Types
Exchange Server 2003 supports different types of recipients depending on how you need to send e-mail to a recipient and where that recipient is located in relation to your Exchange organization.
Securing Exchange Server : Configure Message Hygiene Options (part 2) - Protect Against Unwanted Mail Sources
In addition to protecting your organization from messages that are considered spam or that have inappropriate content, you can also protect against specific mail sources.
Securing Exchange Server : Configure Message Hygiene Options (part 1) - Battle Unwanted Mail
One of the challenges of administering email systems is accurately filtering out messages that are unwanted. These messages, called spam, often appear in the form of advertisements or offensive content
Recovering from a Disaster in an Exchange Server 2010 Environment - Recovering from a Boot Failure
Occasionally, a Windows Server 2008 system can suffer a service or application startup problem that could leave a server incapable of completing a normal bootup sequence
Recovering from a Disaster in an Exchange Server 2010 Environment - Recovering from a Disk Failure
Organizations create disaster recovery plans and procedures to protect against a variety of system failures, but disk failures tend to be the most common in networking environments
Exchange Server 2010 : Manage Permissions (part 2) - Delegate Role-Based Permissions
One of the powerful benefits of RBAC is that you can tailor the access model to meet the needs of your organization at a granular level. You have the ability to edit the existing role groups as well as the ability to add new roles or role groups that you design
Exchange Server 2010 : Manage Permissions (part 1) - Understand the Exchange Server 2010 Administrative Model
The administrative model changes in Exchange Server 2010 rank high in the list of significant changes from earlier versions of Exchange. The implementation of Role-Based Access Controls (RBAC) is more flexible and more granular, and provides some useful capabilities in specifying what administrators can do and where they can do it.
Recovering from a Disaster in an Exchange Server 2010 Environment : Recovering from a Site Failure
When a site becomes unavailable because of a physical access limitation or a disaster such as a fire or earthquake, steps must be taken to provide the recovery of the Exchange server in the site
Recovering from a Disaster in an Exchange Server 2010 Environment : Preparing for a More Easily Recoverable Environment
Steps can be taken to help an organization more easily prepare for a recoverable environment. This involves documenting server states and conditions, performing specific backup procedures, and setting up new features in Exchange Server 2010 that provide for a more simplified restoration process
Exchange Server 2010: Configure Security for Exchange Servers (part 2)
One of the benefits of having servers with multiple roles in Exchange is that each role has its own type of functionality. This means the servers can all be secured in a way that best suits their purpose.
Exchange Server 2010: Configure Security for Exchange Servers (part 1)
One of the benefits of having servers with multiple roles in Exchange is that each role has its own type of functionality. This means the servers can all be secured in a way that best suits their purpose.
Designing the Right Data Storage Structure for Exchange Server 2010 (part 3)
Simple physics tells you that you’ll get improvements in performance as you add more disks to an array. Because each drive’s read/write head can operate simultaneously, you get a fairly linear improvement as drives are added.
Designing the Right Data Storage Structure for Exchange Server 2010 (part 2) - Choosing the Right Type of Disks
When researching SAN and NAS devices, you discover that you have several types of disks available to you. These disks vary by architecture (SCSI versus SATA versus SAS versus Fibre Channel) and by size
Designing the Right Data Storage Structure for Exchange Server 2010 (part 1)
All the high-speed disks in the world won’t amount to much if you can’t get the data to and from the Exchange servers quickly. In a NAS environment, the network itself is the biggest concern for performance.
BizTalk Server 2009: Using dynamic service ports (part 1) - Defining the service
The focus was on static ports with URIs set immediately after the code was deployed. However, there exist a number of legitimate cases where BizTalk does not know where to distribute a message until additional runtime-only context is provided.
Recovering from a Disaster in an Exchange Server 2010 Environment: Identifying the Extent of the Problem (part 2)
The failure of a server does not necessarily mean that the data needs to be restored completely from tape. Often, a server goes down because of a failure with the power supplies, a motherboard failure, or even a processor failure
Recovering from a Disaster in an Exchange Server 2010 Environment: Identifying the Extent of the Problem (part 1)
Before attempting to perform a recovery, it is important to first determine the type and extent of the problem. If the problem is not properly identified, you run the risk of performing an incorrect action that could actually make the problem worse
BizTalk Server 2009: What is MessageBox direct binding?
The easiest way to link orchestration with messaging endpoints is to create logical ports in orchestrations and bind them to physical ports at runtime. A developer using this technique will know for sure that an orchestration will exchange messages with the appropriate ports.
Designing and Optimizing Storage in an Exchange Server 2010 Environment : When Is the Right Time to Implement NAS and SAN Devices?
The first phase of any good project is an in-depth analysis of the environment and its needs. For storage systems, it is critical to identify any systems with special requirements
 
 
 
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