programming4us
         
 
 
Windows Server

Windows Home Server 2011 : Getting More Out of Control Panel (part 2) - Alternative Methods for Opening Control Panel Icons

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
7/11/2013 3:54:28 AM

3. Alternative Methods for Opening Control Panel Icons

Access to many Control Panel icons is scattered throughout the Windows Home Server interface, meaning that there’s more than one way to launch an icon. Many of these alternative methods are faster and more direct than using the Control Panel folder. Here’s a summary:

  • Computer Management— Click Start, right-click Computer, and then click Manage.

  • Date and Time— Click the clock in the taskbar’s notification area, and then click Change Date and Time Settings.

  • Default Programs— Select Start, Default Programs.

  • Devices and Printers— Select Start, Devices and Printers.

  • Folder Options— In Windows Explorer, either select Organize, Folder and Search Options, or press Alt and then select Tools, Folder Options.

  • Fonts— In Windows Explorer, open the %SystemRoot%\Fonts folder.

  • Internet Options— In Internet Explorer, select Tools, Internet Options.

  • Network and Sharing Center— Right-click the notification area’s Network icon, and then click Open Network and Sharing Center.

  • Notification Area Icons— Right-click an empty section of the taskbar’s notification area, and then click Customize Notification Area.

  • Personalization— Right-click the desktop, and then click Personalize.

  • Scheduled Tasks— Select Start, All Programs, Accessories, System Tools, Task Scheduler. Alternatively, in Windows Explorer, open the %SystemRoot%\Tasks folder.

  • Sound— Right-click the Volume icon in the notification area, and then click Sounds.

  • System— Click Start, right-click Computer, and then click Properties. You can also press Windows Logo+Pause/Break.

  • Taskbar and Start Menu— Right-click an empty section of the taskbar or Start button, and then click Properties.

  • Troubleshooting— Right-click the Action Center icon in the notification area, and then click Troubleshoot a Problem.

  • Windows Update— Click Start, All Programs, Windows Update, or right-click the Action Center icon in the notification area and then click Open Windows Update.

Another relatively easy way to get at a Control Panel icon is to use the Windows Home Server search engine, which indexes the Control Panel. Select Start, type some or all of the Control Panel icon name, and then click the icon that appears in the Control Panel section of the search results. For example, in Figure 2 I typed ease in the Search box, and you can see that Ease of Access Center shows up at the top of the results. Several other related Control Panel items also appear in the results.

Figure 2. You can use the Start menu’s Search box to search for Control Panel icons.


Tip

You can create a special shell folder that displays every Control Panel command, organized by topic. Create a new folder on the desktop or some other convenient location, and give the folder the following name:

Full Control Panel.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}


4. Putting a Control Panel Submenu on the Start Menu

You can turn the Start menu’s Control Panel command into a menu that displays the Control Panel icons by following these steps:

1.
Right-click the Start button, and then click Properties. The Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box appears with the Start Menu tab displayed.

2.
Click Customize. The Customize Start Menu dialog box appears.

3.
In the list of Start menu items, find the Control Panel item, and activate the Display as a Menu option.

4.
Click OK.

Figure 3 shows the Start menu with the Control Panel item configured as a menu. Depending on the screen resolution you are using, some of the Control Panel icons might not fit on the screen. In that case, hover the mouse pointer over the downward-pointing arrow at the bottom of the menu to scroll through the rest of the icons. (To scroll up, hover the pointer over the upward-pointing arrow that appears at the top of the menu.)

Figure 3. The Start menu’s Control Panel item configured as a menu.

5. Removing an Icon from Control Panel

You might find that you don’t use some Control Panel icons. For example, if your Windows Home Server computer doesn’t have any iSCSI devices, you’ll never need to use Control Panel’s iSCSI Initiator icon. Because Control Panel contains so many icons, it makes sense to remove those you never use. Doing that makes it easier to find the icon you want and faster to navigate the icons.

Here are the steps for using a group policy to remove icons from Control Panel:

1.
Open the Local Group Policy Editor window.

2.
Navigate to the User Configuration, Administrative Templates, Control Panel branch.

3.
Double-click the Hide Specified Control Panel applets.

4.
Activate the Enabled option.

5.
Click Show to display the Show Contents dialog box.

6.
Click Add to open the Add Item dialog box.

7.
Use the Enter the Item to Be Added text box to specify the Control icon you want to hide. You have two choices:

  • Type the name of the CPL file that corresponds to the Control Panel icon you want to hide.

  • Type the icon caption as it appears in Control Panel. For example, to hide the iSCSI Initiator icon, type iSCSI Initiator.

Note

You can only hide icons that appear in the main Control Panel folder. You can’t hide icons that appear in the Control Panel subfolders, such as Administrative Tools.

8.
Click OK. The Local Group Policy Editor adds the CPL file to the Show Contents dialog box.

9.
Repeat steps 6 to 8 to remove other icons.

10.
Click OK.

6. Showing Only Specified Control Panel Icons

Control Panel is so useful that you’ll probably use most of the icons at least some of the time. However, it’s possible that you may only use a few of the icons most of the time. In that case, you might want to really streamline the Control Panel view by displaying only those few icons you use. Here’s how to do this using a group policy:

1.
Open the Local Group Policy Editor window.

2.
Navigate to the User Configuration, Administrative Templates, Control Panel branch.

3.
Double-click the Show Only Specified Control Panel Applets policy.

4.
Activate the Enabled option.

5.
Click Show to display the Show Contents dialog box.

6.
Click Add to open the Add Item dialog box.

7.
Use the Enter the Item to Be Added text box to specify the Control icon you want to show. You have two choices:

  • Type the name of the CPL file that corresponds to the Control Panel icon you want to show. 

  • Type the icon caption as it appears in Control Panel. For example, to show the Programs and Features icon, type Programs and Features.

8.
Click OK. The Local Group Policy Editor adds the CPL file to the Show Contents dialog box.

9.
Repeat steps 6 to 8 to show other icons.

10.
Click OK.

Note

Group policies also enable you to customize the behavior of some Control Panel icons. When you open the User Configuration, Administrative Templates, Control Panel branch, you’ll see six subbranches that correspond to six Control Panel icons: Add or Remove Programs, Display, Personalization, Printers, Programs, and Regional and Language Options. In each case, you use the policies in a particular subbranch to hide dialog box tabs, specify default settings, and more.

Other -----------------
- Windows Home Server 2011 : Using the Local Group Policy Editor (part 3) - Increasing the Size of the Recent Documents List, Enabling the Shutdown Event Tracker
- Windows Home Server 2011 : Using the Local Group Policy Editor (part 2) - Customizing the Places Bar
- Windows Home Server 2011 : Using the Local Group Policy Editor (part 1) - Working with Group Policies, Customizing the Windows Security Screen
- Windows Server 2012 : Backup and Recovery (part 8) - Backing up and restoring Active Directory
- Windows Server 2012 : Backup and Recovery (part 7) - Backing up and recovering your data - Recovering data stored on another server, Recovering the system state
- Windows Server 2012 : Backup and Recovery (part 6) - Backing up and recovering your data - Tracking scheduled and manual backups, Recovering your data
- Windows Server 2012 : Backup and Recovery (part 5) - Backing up and recovering your data - Performing a one-time backup
- Windows Server 2012 : Backup and Recovery (part 4) - Backing up and recovering your data - Scheduling backups
- Windows Server 2012 : Backup and Recovery (part 3) - Backing up and recovering your data - Using the backup utility, Backing up your data
- Windows Server 2012 : Backup and Recovery (part 2) - Developing backup strategies
- Windows Server 2012 : Backup and Recovery (part 1) - Disaster-planning strategies, Disaster preparedness procedures
- Installing Windows Server 2012 and Server Core : Managing and Configuring a Server Core Installation
- Installing Windows Server 2012 and Server Core : Understanding Server Core Installation
- Windows Server 2008 : Using dnscmd - Adding DNS Zones, Creating and Deleting DNS Records
- Windows Server 2008 : Using dnscmd - Clearing the DNS Cache, Working with DNS Partitions
- Windows Server 2008 : Using dnscmd - Retrieving DNS Information, Exporting DNS Data, Forcing Zone Transfers
- Windows Small Business Server 2011 : Deploying SQL Server 2008 R2 for Small Business
- Windows Small Business Server 2011 : Deploying a Second Domain Controller
- Windows Small Business Server 2011 : Deploying a Second Server (part 2) - Performing Post-Installation Tasks - Changing the Computer Name and Joining the Domain
- Windows Small Business Server 2011 : Deploying a Second Server (part 2) - Performing Post-Installation Tasks - Adjusting Time Zone Settings, Configuring Network Settings
 
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
- First look: Apple Watch

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 1)

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 2)
programming4us programming4us
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS
Celebrity Style, Fashion Trends, Beauty and Makeup Tips.