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Windows Server
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Windwos Server 2008 : Recovering from a Server or System Failure (part 1)
When a failure or issue is reported regarding a Windows Server 2008 R2 system, the responsible administrator should first perform the standard validation tests to verify that there is a real issue.
Windows Server 2008 Server Core : Working with the Remote Desktop Connection Application (part 2)
The display settings you use affect how much screen real estate you have for performing tasks and also affect performance. Using a larger screen size gives you more space to work.
Windows Server 2008 Server Core : Working with the Remote Desktop Connection Application (part 1)
The Remote Desktop Connection application provides the means to connect to Server Core for remote management. You only need this application when you want to access the command prompt on Server Core.
Windows Server 2008 Server Core : Understanding Internal and External Commands
Some commands don't exist in separate files; they reside in the host program that you use to interact with the computer. The host program for the command prompt is CMD.EXE. If you want to try it out, type CMD and press Enter.
Windows Server 2008 : Working with NAP (part 8) - 802.1x Enforcement
IEEE 802.1x standards define an effective framework for controlling and authenticating clients to a wired or wireless protected network—in this case a NAP infrastructure. These standards define port-based authentication on supported devices
Windows Server 2008 : Working with NAP (part 7)
IPsec enforcement breaks a network down to three different logical networks by using health certificates provided by the Health Certificate Server (HCS). Any computer can be a member of only one of the three networks at any given time—membership to the network is determined by the status of the computers health certificate.
Windows Server 2008 : Working with NAP (part 6)
Health Policies check the client for compliance via the system health validators (SHVs). If you recall from earlier in this chapter, we discussed Windows Security Health Validator (WSHV). These SHVs are the ones provided with Windows 2008 Server, Windows Vista or Windows XP Service Pack 3.
Windows Server 2008 : Working with NAP (part 5)
NAP Health Policies are a combination of settings for health determination and enforcement of infrastructure compliance. Health requirement policies on the NAP health policy server determine whether a NAP client is compliant or noncompliant, how to treat noncompliant NAP clients and whether they should automatically remediate their health state, and how to treat clients that are not NAP capable for different NAP enforcement methods.
Windows Server 2008 : Working with NAP (part 4) - Communication Process with VPN Client and NAP
When a Windows Vista or Windows XP Service Pack 3 computer connects to a NPS server that is NAP enabled, the communication process is a little different than a normal VPN connection.
Windows Server 2008 : Working with NAP (part 3) - DHCP Enforcement
In this exercise we are going to implement the DHCP and NPS server roles on the server NPS1. We will then configure NAP with the wizard and also configure the SHVs that will force any connecting client using DHCP to be network compliant.
Windows Server 2008 : Working with NAP (part 2)
The NAP Health Policy Server is the heart of the NAP-supported network infrastructure. The NAP Health Policy Server runs Windows 2008 Server and has the NPS server role installed. The NPS server role is responsible for storing health requirement policies and provides health state validation for NAP.
Windows Server 2008 : Working with NAP (part 1)
The NAP platform main objective is to validate the state of a client computer before connecting to the private network and offer a source of remediation. To validate access to a network based on system health, NAP provides the following areas of functionality
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Remote Access (part 6)
Windows Server 2008 features a variety of inbound and outbound features that you will need to be able to implement for your exam. The old version of Windows Firewall has been upgraded and is now called Windows Firewall with Advanced Security (WFAS).
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Remote Access (part 5) - Virtual Private Networks
VPNs use public wires to join nodes to create a network. This network allows the user to create their own private networks for the transfer of data. There are a large number of security systems at play within the VPN, such as encryption and other security measures
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Remote Access (part 4)
Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) is a feature that permits you to use Windows Server 2008 to connect a small office network or home network over the Internet. Not much has changed in this version of Windows Server 2008, and you may find that most of the features and set up procedures are very similar to that of Windows Server 2003
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Remote Access (part 3)
Remote access policies are an ordered set of rules that define how connections are either authorized or rejected. For each rule, there are one or more conditions, a set of profile settings, and a remote access permission setting
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Remote Access (part 2) - Network Policy Server and Network Access Protection
Remote access is commonly used by many companies today to allow access to a computer or a network from a remote location. Most corporations include people at branch offices, telecommuters, and people who are traveling that will need to be able to gain access to network resources
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Remote Access (part 1) - Routing and Remote Access Services
Remote access is commonly used by many companies today to allow access to a computer or a network from a remote location. Most corporations include people at branch offices, telecommuters, and people who are traveling that will need to be able to gain access to network resources
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Wireless Access
Wireless networking hardware requires the use of technology that deals with radio frequencies as well as data transmission. The most widely used standard is 802.11 produced by the IEEE
Windows Server 2008: Configuring Routing
Routing is a sometimes-confused aspect of networking, which can be complicated due to lack of fundamental understanding and training. All information that travels through a network has two things in common: a device that sent it and a required routing decision
Windows Firewall with Advanced Security in Windows Server 2008 (part 3)
You can configure different settings for different profiles. As mentioned earlier, there are three profiles: domain, private, and public. Figure 5 shows the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security Properties accessed by right-clicking Windows Firewall with Advanced Security and selecting Properties from the menu.
Windows Firewall with Advanced Security in Windows Server 2008 (part 2)
Windows Firewall with Advanced Security is a stateful firewall and as such, it inspects all packets for all IP traffic (IPv4 and IPv6). The default setting is that all incoming traffic is blocked automatically unless it is a response to a host request (called solicited traffic) or unless it specifically has been allowed.
Windows Firewall with Advanced Security in Windows Server 2008 (part 1)
Firewalls can run on a network’s perimeter to protect computers on the network via filtering both inbound and outbound traffic. Firewalls can also run on a host computer to protect that host. Let’s look briefly at these two types of configurations.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring IP Security (IPsec)
The IP Security (IPsec) protocol is a standard that provides cryptographic security services for IP traffic. IPsec is an end-to-end security solution. The only two nodes aware of IPsec traffic on the network are the two peers communicating with each other.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Network Authentication (part 2)
Although it’s outside the scope of this chapter to go into the details of PKI, it is useful to look at some of the ways PKI can be used as part of a Windows-based authentication infrastructure for secure network access using the protocols
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Network Authentication (part 1)
Let’s start with a quick review of the basics to set the foundation for this discussion of network access and authentication. Windows Server 2008 authentication is a two-part process involving authentication of the user (interactive login) and access control to network resources
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring IPv4 and IPv6 Addressing
Windows Server 2008 should install IPv4 and IPv6 by default so that you can configure them on the network interface card (NIC). If they’re not already installed, you can install them from the Local Area Connection Properties dialog box
Windows Server 2008 : Managing the Terminal Services - Displaying Data Prioritization
Printing and file transfer traffic are considered as virtual channel traffic. If such virtual channel traffic takes priority over the terminal service traffic such as display, keyboard, and mouse, it may adversely affect the performance as virtual channel traffic consumes a lot of bandwidth.
Windows Server 2008 : Managing the Terminal Services - Viewing Processes & Monitoring Sessions
Terminal Services Manager also provides information on processes that are running on a terminal server. This information is available from the Processes tab of the right pane
Windows Server 2008 : Managing the Terminal Services - Limits
You can configure the number of simultaneous remote connections on a server. Administrators may decide to restrict remote connections to enhance the performance of the server or for security purposes.
 
 
 
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