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Windows Server
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Windows Server 2008 : Use the Command-Line Server Manager (ServerManagerCmd.exe)
To get started, you need to be a member of the Administrators group on the server and be running a command prompt with elevated privileges. From the command prompt, you can type ServerManagerCmd.exe -help to get started. Note that the response provides syntax and parameter information
Windows Server 2008 : Perform Role and Feature Management
Before performing the steps of role and feature installation, it’s a good idea to get a better grasp of the many different options you actually have at your disposal. Unlike the roles that are allowed through Server Core , there is a great deal more you can do with a fully functional Windows Server 2008 system.
Windows Server 2008 : Use Initial Configuration Tasks
The Initial Configuration Tasks Wizard appears immediately after your first login after your installation. This wizard was designed to assist administrators in configuring servers postinstallation. In fact, many of the questions that you might typically answer during a server installation are handled in Windows Server 2008 in this wizard, after the server OS has been installed.
Windows Server 2008 : Install and Configure the File Services Role
You can solve this problem by installing the File Services role in Server 2008. The File Services role is not a single application but a group of services that facilitate sharing files—distributing shares over several servers, managing resources (including reporting), providing search capability, and providing support for POSIX clients.
Configure IPv6 in Windows Server 2008
While IPv4 is still a widely used standard and most of our examples focus primarily on IPv4, in installing and configuring server roles, we do give attention to the IPv6 standard. Therefore, it is beneficial to be aware of what IPv6 is and how it will affect you today and going forward in the network.
Windows Server 2008 : Install and Configure the DHCP Server Role
With technology budgets shrinking and more demand being put on IT staff to provide business solutions, there is a need to automate normal IT functions and make management easier. One of the often-overlooked but perhaps most efficient time-saving tool is the DHCP Server role
Windows Server 2008 : Install and Configure the DNS Server Role
There are two ways to install the DNS Server role in Windows Server 2008. The first is in the Initial Configuration Tasks window. This screen prompts you to perform several actions after the initial installation of Windows Server 2008, including adding roles and features to your server.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Storage
In the mid- to late 1990s, storage was not a real issue because most organizations didn’t need to store large amounts of data or archives. This is not the case today, as there is a great need for storage and archiving. The demand for storage and archiving, coupled with the high availability of storage, has increased exponentially.
Windows Server 2008 : The Windows Deployment Service
RIS has been updated and redesigned to become Windows Deployment Services (WDS) in Windows Server 2008; it has a number of changes relating to RIS features. This also applies to WDS installed on Windows Server 2003. WDS enables deployments of operating systems such as Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista in small environments, to rollouts of up to hundreds of servers or client-operating systems
Windows Server 2008 : Publishing Applications with TS RemoteApp
Before Windows Server 2008, TS users who needed to run an application on a remote terminal server first needed to establish a desktop session on the server and then launch the application within that desktop session. With TS RemoteApp, the application alone is streamed through RDP to a resizable window on the user’s local desktop.
Windows Server 2008 : Deploying Terminal Services Gateway
TS Gateway is an optional TS component that enables authorized Remote Desktop clients to establish Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) sessions between the Internet and Terminal Services resources found behind a firewall on a private network.
Windows Server 2008 : Managing Terminal Services User Connections
Terminal Services Manager (TSM) is the main administrative tool used to manage connections to a terminal server. You can use TSM to view information about users connected to a terminal server, to monitor user sessions, or to perform administrative tasks such as logging users off or disconnecting user sessions.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Terminal Services Clients
The Terminal Services client, Remote Desktop Connection (RDC), is highly configurable. For example, you can configure the client to display remote desktops with a certain screen resolution or to make certain local drives available in the session.
Windows Server 2008 Server Core : Configuring the Command Window
Many users start the command window, see the typical command prompt, and just assume that they'll never see anything else. Since the command window is your main tool in Server Core, you should know how to configure it to meet your needs
Windows Server 2008 Server Core : The Command Line Made Easy
Some people are of the opinion that the command line works one way. You type in a command and hope that you got all of the information right and received the correct result, which you then have to interpret
Windows Server 2008 Server Core : Accessing DLLs Using the RunDLL32 Utility
It's easy to think of a command as a built-in function within CMD.EXE and a utility as an external application that you run. However, the command line presents a third alternative, one that you might not have ever considered.
Windows Server 2008 Server Core : Configuring the Server for Initial Use
Installing Server Core is only part of the installation process. When you start Server Core the first time, you'll need to perform some configuration that you might not have had to perform in the past
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Terminal Services (part 3)
This tab enables you to set user permissions for all RDP connections to the terminal server. It is recommended that you do not use this tab to configure user access to Terminal Services; for that, use the Remote Desktop Users group instead.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Terminal Services (part 2)
You can use the Sessions tab to control session timeout settings for the terminal server. Specifically, this tab enables you to choose timeout settings for disconnected sessions, set time limits for active and idle sessions, and define the behavior for disconnections and session limits.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Terminal Services (part 1)
You have to specify whether the terminal server will accept connections only from clients that can perform NLA. When you select this requirement, Remote Desktop connections will be blocked from computers with operating systems earlier than Windows Vista.
Windows Server 2008 : Deploying a Terminal Server (part 2) - Specifying NLA Settings
You have to specify whether the terminal server will accept connections only from clients that can perform NLA. When you select this requirement, Remote Desktop connections will be blocked from computers with operating systems earlier than Windows Vista.
Windows Server 2008 : Deploying a Terminal Server (part 1)
Terminal Services enables remote users to establish interactive desktops or application sessions on a computer running Windows Server 2008. During a Terminal Services session, Terminal Services clients offload virtually the entire processing load for that session to the terminal server.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Server Clusters (part 2)
In Windows Server 2008, you can configure three types of server groups for load balancing, scalability, and high availability. First, a round-robin distribution group is a set of computers that uses DNS to provide basic load balancing with minimal configuration requirements
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Server Clusters (part 1)
In Windows Server 2008, you can configure three types of server groups for load balancing, scalability, and high availability. First, a round-robin distribution group is a set of computers that uses DNS to provide basic load balancing with minimal configuration requirements
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Server Storage (part 3) - Configuring a Mount Point
A mount point is a folder in a volume that acts as a pointer to the root directory of another volume. For example, if you need to make more storage space available to the system or boot disk, you can create a new volume on another disk and then mount that volume in a folder in the system volume.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Server Storage (part 2) - Managing Disks, Volumes, and Partitions
The main tool you can use to manage disks, volumes, and partitions in Windows Server 2008 is Disk Management. With Disk Management, you can initialize disks, bring disks online or offline, create volumes within disks, format volumes, change disk partition styles, extend and shrink volumes, and create fault-tolerant disk sets.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Server Storage (part 1)
As the demand for server storage has grown, so too has the number of new storage technologies. Over the years, the range of server storage options has broadened from simple direct-attached storage (DAS) to network-attached storage (NAS) and, most recently, to Fibre Channel (FC) and iSCSI SANs.
Use the Microsoft Management Console (MMC)
The Microsoft Management Console (MMC) can be used to review, configure, and identify issues within the environment. MMC is nothing new to the Windows OS. You may have used it extensively while working with Windows 2000/2003 Server.
Manage Windows Server 2008 : Work with Preconfigured MMCs
Although there are many preconfigured MMCs, in this section, we focus on just two MMCs that are directly associated with managing your Windows Server 2008 OS
Manage Windows Server 2008 : Work with the Task Scheduler
The Task Scheduler enables you to automate many different tasks on your server. You might be familiar with the Task Scheduler from previous Windows server operating systems. However, the Task Scheduler in Windows Server 2008 has much more functionality than those earlier versions.
 
 
 
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