programming4us
         
 
 
Windows

Windows 7 : Configuring a Peer-to-Peer Network (part 2)

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
7/7/2013 9:27:32 PM

2. Choosing Your Network Location

When you connect to a new network for the first time, Windows 7 will prompt you to choose a network location. The type of location you select determines the Windows Firewall settings that are applied and the networking features that will be available. As an example, a higher level of security is required when you connect to the Internet in an airport lobby, as opposed to the network in your home. Windows remembers the location setting for each different network to which you connect, so you can be sure that the appropriate level of security is always applied.

The following three network location choices are available:

  • Home— A Home network is one where you trust the other computers on the network. (That is, you trust the people using the other computers.) File and printer sharing is enabled, as is Network Discovery, which makes your computer visible to other users and makes their computers visible to you. It’s possible to join a homegroup, which we’ll discuss shortly.

  • Work— A Work network is like a Home network. Other computers are trusted. File and printer sharing and Network Discovery are enabled. It’s not possible to create a homegroup; so, if you are setting up a small office network and want to use the HomeGroup system, feel free to set your computer’s location to Home.

  • Public— A Public network is one where you don’t trust the other users or computers on the network. File and printer sharing and Network Discovery are disabled on this network connection.

    Any connection that leads directly to the Internet without a firewall or router in between must be designated a Public network to protect your computer from the hackers and bad software “out there.” This goes for dial-up Internet as well as Ethernet connections that plug into a cable or DSL modem.

    You should also select Public when you are connecting to any wired or wireless network or Internet service in a hotel, Internet café, airport, dorm, school, and so on, and even an office network belonging to a client, customer, or anyone else whom you don’t want poking into your computer.

    Here’s a good rule of thumb: If you don’t need to use file sharing and printer sharing in a given location, select the Public location.

Caution

If you connect to a wireless or wired network that you’ve never used before and Windows doesn’t quickly prompt you to select the network location type, change the location manually, using the following procedure.


When you move your computer from one network to another, Windows will usually detect the change and prompt you to select a new network location.

To change your network location manually

1.
Click Start, Network and Internet, View Network Status and Tasks.

2.
Locate the icon for the active network connection and click the Home Network, Work Network, or Public Network label next to the icon.

3.
Select the correct network location.

3. Setting Your Computer Identification

After you’ve configured your network, the next step is to make sure that each of the computers on your network is a member of the same domain or workgroup.

Note

Your domain administrator must know about your new computer and create a computer account for it before you try to add your computer to the domain.


If you are part of a Windows domain-type network, your system administrator will give you the information you need to set your computer identification.

If you are setting up your own network of Windows computers without Windows Server, click Start, right-click Computer, and select Properties. Look at the “Computer Name, Domain, and Workgroup settings” section on each of the computers on your network. Do they each have a different full computer name and the same workgroup name? If so, you’re all set.

If not, click Change Settings, click the Network ID button, and prepare to answer the wizard’s questions. Click Next on the wizard’s first screen. You are asked to select the option that best describes your computer:

  • This Computer Is Part of a Business Network; I Use It to Connect to Other Computers at Work.

  • This Computer Is a Home Computer; It’s Not Part of a Business Network.

Note

If you use the Home Computer option, be sure that all your computers are set up the same way, with the workgroup name WORKGROUP. Otherwise, you’ll have trouble working with the other computers on your network.


Which one you choose makes a significant difference. If you choose the “Home Computer” option, the wizard sets up your computer for peer-to-peer networking with the workgroup name WORKGROUP and finishes.

If you choose the “Business Network” option, Windows configures your computer for a higher standard of security than it will for home use.

The wizard next asks you to choose from one of the following responses:

  • My Company Uses a Network With a Domain

  • My Company Uses a Network Without a Domain

If you are joining an existing domain network managed by Windows Server, check With a Domain (but you should consult with your network manager first).

Caution

You must be sure that every computer on your network uses the same workgroup name if you want them to be able to easily share files and printers.


Otherwise, if you are building your own network , select Without a Domain and click Next.

The last question asks for a name for the network workgroup. Leave the default setting WORKGROUP in place.

Click Next and then click Finish to complete the setup. You need to let Windows restart your computer if you changed any of the settings or names.

4. Configuring Windows Firewall

It is a good idea to check that Windows Firewall is set up correctly; otherwise, you could end up exposed to Internet hacking, or you could find that your network is so locked down that you can’t use file and printer sharing. 

If your Windows 7 computer is connected to a domain network, your network manager can and should configure your computer so that it uses a correctly configured firewall “profile” when you are connected to the corporate network. You won’t be able to change these settings. You network manager will also probably configure another “default” profile to protect you when you are disconnected from the corporate network, such as when you are traveling or using your computer at home.

In this section, I assume that you are managing your own computer and that your network is not protected by a professionally installed firewall. Home and small office users should go through this quick checklist of steps to confirm that your network will function safely:

1.
Log on using a Computer Administrator account. Click Start, Control Panel, System and Security, Windows Firewall.

2.
Click Turn Windows Firewall On or Off. In both the Home or Work (Private) and Public sections, be sure that Turn On Windows Firewall is selected, and that Notify Me When Windows Firewall Blocks a New Program is checked.

In general, Block All Incoming Connections doesn’t need to be checked. You can check it in the Public profile section to get the strongest security, but you might not be able to use some Internet services like FTP (file transfer), telephone, or voice or video chat.

These are the default settings, but it’s best to check them to be sure.

Other -----------------
- Windows 7 : Creating a Windows Network - Installing a Wireless Network (part 2) - Setting Up a New Wireless Network
- Windows 7 : Creating a Windows Network - Installing a Wireless Network (part 1) - Wireless Network Setup Choices
- Windows 8 : Configuring Network Connections (part 2) - Configuring DNS Resolution, Configuring WINS Resolution
- Windows 8 : Configuring Network Connections (part 1) - Configuring Static IP Addresses, Configuring Multiple Gateways
- Windows 8 : Installing Networking Components
- Windows 8 : Navigating Windows 8 Networking Features
- Windows 7 : Migrating the Existing User Data - Working with Windows Easy Transfer (part 2)
- Windows 7 : Migrating the Existing User Data - Working with Windows Easy Transfer (part 1)
- Windows 7 : Migrating the Existing User Data - Exploring User Data and Settings
- Implementing Windows Vista’s Internet Security and Privacy Features (part 10) - Working with Email Safely and Securely - Obtaining Another Person’s Public Key
- Implementing Windows Vista’s Internet Security and Privacy Features (part 9) - Working with Email Safely and Securely - Maintaining Your Privacy While Reading Email, Setting Up an Email Account with a
- Implementing Windows Vista’s Internet Security and Privacy Features (part 8) - Working with Email Safely and Securely - Thwarting Spam with Windows Mail’s Junk Filter
- Implementing Windows Vista’s Internet Security and Privacy Features (part 7) - Working with Email Safely and Securely - Protecting Yourself Against Email Viruses
- Implementing Windows Vista’s Internet Security and Privacy Features (part 6) - Enhancing Online Privacy by Managing Cookies, Blocking Pop-Up Windows
- Implementing Windows Vista’s Internet Security and Privacy Features (part 5) - Encoding Addresses to Prevent IDN Spoofing
- Implementing Windows Vista’s Internet Security and Privacy Features (part 4) - Surfing the Web Securely - Thwarting Phishers with the Phishing Filter
- Implementing Windows Vista’s Internet Security and Privacy Features (part 3) - Surfing the Web Securely - Adding and Removing Zone Sites, Changing a Zone’s Security Level
- Implementing Windows Vista’s Internet Security and Privacy Features (part 2) - Thwarting Spyware with Windows Defender
- Implementing Windows Vista’s Internet Security and Privacy Features (part 1)
- Windows 7 : Creating a Windows Network - Installing Network Wiring
 
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
- First look: Apple Watch

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 1)

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 2)
programming4us programming4us
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS
Celebrity Style, Fashion Trends, Beauty and Makeup Tips.