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Windows
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Windows 7 : Getting to Know the Registry (part 1) - Understanding Registry Settings
The Registry may be a dangerous tool, but you can mitigate that danger somewhat by becoming familiar with the layout of the Registry and what it various bits and parts are used for
Windows 7 : Firing Up the Registry Editor
You want to change what kind of document is created when the user clicks the New button in a document library. For example, say that you want to make the New button create a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation out of a specific template in the document library that is specific for presentations. Or say that you want a Microsoft Excel template for expense reports to open in the Expense Reports document library.
Windows Azure : Managing Access Control Service Resources (part 2)
An issuer is the issuer of an input token to ACS. In ACS, an issuer consists of a set of cryptographic key materials that service consumers use when authenticating with ACS. The cryptographic keys can be either a pair of Base64-encoded 32-byte keys or an X.509 certificate
Windows Azure : Managing Access Control Service Resources (part 1)
Access Control resources are defined in your service namespace and are used to define the federation schemes, rules, token issuers, and policies that help realize claims-based identity federation and mapping in the cloud.
Windows Azure : Access Control Service Management Portal
The ACS Management Portal provides limited functionality for creating and managing service namespaces and AC resources for service namespaces. A service namespace defines the namespace for your AC resources.
Windows 7 : Reset a Broken Service
If Windows 7 is acting erratically (or, I should say, if it’s acting more erratically than usual), the problem could be a service that’s somehow gotten corrupted. How can you tell? The most obvious clue is an error message that tells you a particular service isn’t running or couldn’t start.
Windows 7 : Make Windows Shut Down Services Faster
If it seems to take Windows forever to shut down, the culprit might be all those services that it has running because Windows has to shut down each service one by one before it can shut down the PC. In each case, Windows waits a certain amount of time for the service to close, and if it hasn’t closed in that time, Windows kills the service.
Windows 7 : Disable Services for Faster Performance
Windows understands this, so many services don’t run automatically at startup. Instead, the services run only when you or a program requests them. So you can improve Windows performance by doing two things
Windows 7 : Controlling Services with a Script
If you want to automate service control, but you want to also control the startup type, you need to go beyond the command line and create scripts that manage your services. Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) has a class called Win32_Service that represents a Windows service.
Windows 7 : Controlling Services at the Command Prompt
If you regularly stop and start certain services, loading the Services snap-in and manually stopping and then restarting each service can be time-consuming. A better method is to take advantage of the NET STOP and NET START command-line tools, which enable you to stop and start any service that isn’t disabled.
Windows 7 : Controlling Services with the Services Snap-In
The Services snap-in that appears displays a list of the installed services, and for each service, it displays the name of the service and a brief description, the current status of the service, the service’s startup type, and the name of the system account that the service uses to logs on at startup.
Windows Azure : Access Control Service Usage Scenarios (part 3)
In this scenario, an independent software vendor (ISV) named My Energy has an energy-management cloud service that it offers to multiple utility companies. The service performs data collection from power meters on houses and commercial buildings and offers this data to utility companies for reporting and processing.
Windows Azure : Access Control Service Usage Scenarios (part 2)
In this scenario, two partner enterprises would like to collaborate on each other's collaboration platforms. Enterprise A is a software company that manufactures operating system software
Windows Azure : Access Control Service Usage Scenarios (part 1)
Now that you understand the claims-based identity and ACS concepts, some real-world scenarios provide more clarity about these concepts. This section presents three real-world scenarios
Windows Azure : Access Control Service - Claims-Based Identity Model
This section goes over the details of the claims-based identity model in ACS. Figure 1 illustrates the interaction between different components in a claims-based identity model. With the terminology defined, it will be much easier for you to understand the flow of information between different parties in this model.
Windows Azure : Access Control Service - Concepts and Terminology
An identity provider manages your identity and provides an authentication service for client applications. Identity providers authenticate users and issue Security Assertions Markup Language (SAML) tokens (defined in a moment).
Windows 7 : Configuring the MMC - Creating a Custom Taskpad View
A taskpad view is a custom configuration of the MMC results (right) pane for a given snap-in. By default, the results pane shows a list of the snap-in’s contents—for example, the list of categories and devices in the Device Manager snap-in and the list of installed services in the Services snap-in.
Windows 7 : Configuring the MMC - Controlling Snap-Ins with Group Policies
If you share Windows 7 with other people, you can control which snap-ins they’re allowed to use, and you can even prevent users from adding snap-ins to the MMC.
Windows 7 : Configuring the MMC - Adding a Snap-In
You start building your console file by adding one or more snap-ins to the console root, which is the top-level MMC container.
Configuring the Microsoft Management Console : Reviewing the Windows 7 Snap-Ins
When you work with the MMC interface, what you’re really doing is editing a Microsoft Common Console Document, a .msc file that stores one or more snap-ins, the console view, and the taskpad view used by each snap-in branch
Windows 7 : Enabling the Shutdown Event Tracker
When you select Start, Shut Down, Windows 7 proceeds to shut down without any more input from you (unless any running programs have documents with unsaved changes). That’s usually a good thing, but you might want to keep track of why you shut down or restart Windows 7, or why the system itself initiates a shutdown or restart
Windows 7 : Increasing the Size of the Recent Documents List
You can specify a value between 1 and 9,999 (!) in the Maximum Number of Recent Documents spin box. If you specify more documents than can fit vertically on your screen, Windows 7 adds scroll buttons to the top and bottom of the My Recent Documents list.
Windows 7 : Customizing the Places Bar
The left side of the old-style Save As and Open dialog boxes in Windows 7 include icons for several common locations: Recent Places, Desktop, Libraries, Computer, and Network
Windows 7 : Customizing the Windows Security Window
When you press Ctrl+Alt+Delete while logged on to Windows 7, you see the Windows Security window, which contains the following buttons
Windows 7 : Working with Group Policies
Windows comes with another tool called the Local Security Policy Editor, which displays only the policies found in the Local Group Policy Editor Computer Configuration, Windows Settings, Security Settings branch. To launch the Local Security Policy Editor, select Start, type secpol.msc, and press Enter. As you might expect, this snap-in isn’t available in the Windows 7 Home editions.
Policing Windows 7 with Group Policies
You’ve seen in many places throughout this book that you can perform some pretty amazing things by using a tool that’s about as hidden as any Windows power tool can be: the Local Group Policy Editor.
Windows Azure Storage : Queue Scenarios
In the previous section, you learned to send messages to queues in the Queue service. In this section, you learn to retrieve these messages using the Get Messages operation
Windows Azure Storage : Message Operations (part 2) - Get Messages
In the previous section, you learned to send messages to queues in the Queue service. In this section, you learn to retrieve these messages using the Get Messages operation
Windows Azure Storage : Message Operations (part 1) - Put Message
You want to use a slide library to share slides with other people or use slides that other people have shared with you.
Windows Azure Storage : Queue Operations
You can think of Queue as a message queuing system in the cloud. For example, if you want to send and receive messages across diverse applications in different domains, Windows Azure Queue may fit your requirement
 
 
 
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