programming4us
           
 
 
Programming

Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 : Using the Concurrency Visualizer (part 2) - CPU Utilization View, The Threads View

- Windows 10 Product Activation Keys Free 2019
- How to active Windows 8 without product key
- Malwarebytes Premium 3.7.1 Serial Keys (LifeTime) 2019
7/8/2013 3:53:20 AM

1. CPU Utilization View

CPU Utilization view displays utilization of the logical cores in the system. Logical cores include virtual cores from solutions such as hyperthreading.

CPU Utilization View

In the preceding graphic, the y-axis represents the logical cores, and the x-axis is the timeline, shown in milliseconds. There is a Zoom slider control above the graph. Drag right to enlarge the graph. You can also drag the mouse horizontally across the graph to zoom in to a portion of the graph.

Each color on the graph indicates a type of process and its relative CPU utilization. The legend explains the purpose of each color.

  • Green indicates the CPU utilization of the current application.

  • Yellow shows CPU utilization for other applications.

  • Red is the percentage of CPU utilization accorded to the system.

  • Gray shows idle processor cores.

If in doubt, you can point to an area of the graph to see a tooltip that provides information on that portion of the graph. For example, if you point to the green portion of the graph, the name and process identifier for the current process displays.

CPU Utilization view is good for exposing a variety of problems, including low CPU utilization, which could be an indicator of deadlocks or over-synchronization. You can even spot excessive CPU utilization from other applications competing for processor resources.

2. The Threads View

The Threads view provides the most information of the three views. There are several regions to the Threads view, as depicted in the following graphic.

The Threads View

The central region is a graph, where the x-axis is a timeline in milliseconds. The y-axis presents mixed information. The top two rows are disk-read and disk-write activity. The remaining rows are threads. These rows are labeled with a brief description and the thread identifier. The various color segments in the bar graph indicate execution status. For example, green indicates a running thread. The Visible Timeline Profile has an explanation of each category. It also shows the percentage of time spent in each of these categories.

The execution categories are:

  • Execution . The thread is running unimpeded.

  • Synchronization . The thread is blocked for synchronization. The Concurrency Visualizer will attempt to identify the source of the synchronization.

  • I/O . The thread is blocking on an input/output event.

  • Sleep . The thread voluntarily yields the CPU. Thread.Sleep is the most common method for yielding the CPU.

  • Memory Management . The thread is incurring blocking events related to memory-related activities, such as page faults.

  • Preemption . The thread is preempted by another thread. For example, this would occur when a higher-priority thread starts running.

  • UI Processing . The user interface has a message pump, which handles messages for the main window. For a responsive user interface, the message pump is typically idle while waiting to respond to the next user interface message. This category indicates the amount of work the user interface thread is performing in response to user interface requests.

You can sort the threads in the graph on these categories. The sort button appears above and to the left of the graph.

A segment is a contiguous region in one category of execution. You can point to a segment for additional information. You’ll see different information depending on the category. As shown in the following graphic for preemption, the replacing thread, the delay, and other information is displayed in the tooltip.

UI Processing

You can also select segments in the graph. When you click a segment to select it, the selection enlarges for emphasis. In addition, some regions of the graph are in the context of the selected segment, such as the Current stack and Unblocking stack results.

As with CPU Utilization view, you can enlarge the entire graph by using the Zoom slider control or by dragging horizontally to zoom in to a particular span.

You can also hide threads to focus on specific threads. Using the row labels, select the threads you want to hide. Open the context menu for the selection, and choose Hide. The graph for these is hidden threads and does not contribute to the analysis performed for graph or reports. The calculations in the Threads view are adjusted to reflect only the visible threads.

The Report Section

The report section, shown here, appears at the bottom of the graph in the Threads view.

The Report Section

The first tab is the Profile Report. The Profile Report can present different reports based on the category selected in the Visible Timeline Profile. The default report is the Per-Thread Summary report. Select Execution in the Visible Timeline Profile to see the Execution Profile report. Select the Synchronization category for the Synchronization Blocking Profile report, and so on. The Sleep Blocking Profile is shown in the next image. This report displays a sampling showing when methods are in a sleep state. The Inclusive Blocking column includes sampling for both the selected method and its calling methods. The Exclusive Blocking column shows the sampling for that method alone. In the following report, the last method contributes the entire sampling, because the Inclusive Blocking and Exclusive Blocking columns are identical.

The Report Section

The Current Stack tab shows the call stack of the selected segment in the Threads View graph. If you select a different segment, the call stack is updated to reflect that. The Current Stack report might display addition information; the category of the selected segment sets the context for this information. For example, the report for a preemption segment, as shown here, explains the type of synchronization and length of delay.

The Report Section

The Unblocking Stack tab is helpful in finding a deadlock. When the category of the segment is Synchronization, switch to the Unblocking Stack tab to view the call stack of the competing thread that controls the synchronization.

Other -----------------
- Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 : Reports and Debugging - Using the Parallel Stacks Window
- Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 : Reports and Debugging - Using the Parallel Tasks Window
- Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 : Debugging with Visual Studio 2010 (part 2) - Debugging Threads
- Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 : Debugging with Visual Studio 2010 (part 1) - Live Debugging, Performing Post-Mortem Analysis
- .NET Components : Serialization and Class Hierarchies (part 2) - Manual Base-Class Serialization
- .NET Components : Serialization and Class Hierarchies (part 1) - Custom Serialization and Base Classes
- .NET Components : Custom Serialization (part 2) - Constraining Serialization
- .NET Components : Custom Serialization (part 1) - The ISerializable Interface, Implementing ISerializable
- .NET Components : Serialization and Streams - Serializing Multiple Objects
- Microsoft ASP.NET 3.5 : Writing HTTP Handlers (part 5) - Advanced HTTP Handler Programming
- Microsoft ASP.NET 3.5 : Writing HTTP Handlers (part 4) - Serving Images More Effectively
- Microsoft ASP.NET 3.5 : Writing HTTP Handlers (part 3) - The Picture Viewer Handler
- Microsoft ASP.NET 3.5 : Writing HTTP Handlers (part 2) - An HTTP Handler for Quick Data Reports
- Microsoft ASP.NET 3.5 : Writing HTTP Handlers (part 1) - The IHttpHandler Interface
- Microsoft ASP.NET 3.5 : HTTP Handlers and Modules - Quick Overview of the IIS Extensibility API
- Programming WCF Services : Queued Services - The HTTP Bridge
- Microsoft ASP.NET 4 : Ajax - Extender Controls (part 2) - A Modal Pop-up Dialog-Style Component
- Microsoft ASP.NET 4 : Ajax - Extender Controls (part 1) - The AutoComplete Extender
- Mobile Handheld Devices : DATA SYNCHRONIZATION
- Mobile Handheld Devices : MEMORY, STORAGE AND BATTERIES
 
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
- First look: Apple Watch

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 1)

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 2)
programming4us programming4us
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS