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Using Non-Windows Systems to Access Exchange Server 2007 : Terminal Server Client for Mac

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7/8/2013 4:13:35 AM

1. Terminal Server Client for Mac

The Terminal Server Client for Mac, shown in Figure 1, can be considered and planned in the same manner as its Windows counterpart. When the prerequisites are met, administrators can use the Terminal Server Client to provide full Windows and application functionality to Mac users requiring Exchange services and more.

Figure 1. Terminal Server Client for the Macintosh.


Through Terminal Services technology, Mac users are able to fully access the Windows client and Outlook application with all the features and functionality of Windows-based users, including network shares and printers.

Compatibility, Features, and Functionality

Because this Remote Desktop Connection for Mac uses Windows Terminal Services, the only compatibility concern to be considered is the actual connection manager. All applications, when being run, are executed remotely and do not require additional compatibility between Windows-based applications, such as Outlook and the Mac client.

The Remote Desktop Connection manager is compatible with the Mac OS X 10.1 version or later. If required on an earlier version of the Mac client, upgrade the Mac operating system to meet the operating system requirements. Also ensure that the Mac client hardware meets the minimum hardware requirements for installing the Remote Desktop Connection for Mac, as shown in Table 1.

Table 1. Remote Desktop Hardware Requirements
ProcessorMemoryHard Disk Space
Mac PowerPC128MB3MB for installation
  1.1MB after installation

One of the biggest benefits to the Remote Desktop Connection client for the Mac is its integration with Windows and Mac clients. Because of this compatibility, Mac users are able to leverage the functionality and features of Microsoft Outlook when accessing Exchange information and also leverage some of the following enhanced features when integrating Mac clients into a Windows Terminal Services environment:

  • Access to Windows— The Remote Desktop Connection for Mac provides full access for Mac users into the Windows environment. This connection can be configured to the Windows desktop or restricted to an application such as Outlook.

  • Printing— Through the Terminal Services connection, Mac users can access network printing and print information from applications to a networked Windows printer. To further enhance this feature, Mac users can print Windows information to the local Mac printer.

  • Access to Data— Through the copy feature, Mac users are fully enabled to copy and paste data between the Mac client and the Windows Terminal Services session.

Before beginning any installation of the Remote Desktop Connection for Mac, Microsoft Windows Terminal Services and remote access must be enabled for supporting a remote connection with one or more of the following Microsoft Windows operating systems:

  • Windows XP— Supported only through the Remote Desktop Connection feature of Windows XP, this method is limited to one concurrent connection.

  • Windows 2003— Supported in all versions of Windows Server 2003, Terminal Services can be enabled to support remote access for multiple, simultaneous connections.

  • Windows 2000— Included in Windows 2000 Enterprise, Standard, and Datacenter Editions, the Terminal Service Application mode component must be enabled and will support multiple, simultaneous connections.

Tip

When using Terminal Services for multiple client connections from Mac and Windows users, performance is dependent on the total amount of simultaneous connections and the total amount of available hardware resources installed in the server.


Installing the Terminal Server Client

To install and configure the Remote Desktop Connection for Mac, let’s begin with a simple scenario of creating a one-to-one connection. In this scenario, you configure a Windows XP desktop and a Mac client to provide remote desktop connectivity to Microsoft Outlook.

To begin, enable the Remote Desktop feature of the Windows XP client by following these steps:

1.
From the Windows XP desktop, select Start, My Computer and open the Properties page by right-clicking the Remote Desktop icon and selecting Properties.

2.
Select the Remote tab and check the Allow Users to Connect Remotely to This Computer check box.

3.
Next, assign the account that may access the desktop remotely by clicking the Select the Remote Users button. Assign or create an account for the Mac users to authenticate with when accessing the Windows XP system remotely.

After the remote desktop configuration is complete and the client permissions to access Windows remotely have been configured, begin the installation of the Remote Desktop Connection for Mac by ensuring that the Mac client can communicate via TCP/IP on the network. Follow these steps to configure TCP/IP on the Mac client.

1.
From the Apple menu, select Control, TCP/IP properties.

2.
In the TCP/IP dialog box, configure the TCP/IP properties. In this scenario, configure the TCP/IP properties using a Static setting. Select the Connect Via option and select Ethernet.

3.
From the Configure tab, select Manual.

4.
Enter the TCP/IP properties for the client and the DNS address being used on your network.

5.
Close the TCP/IP properties and reboot the Mac system.

To install the Remote Desktop Connection for Mac, download the installation file from Microsoft and place the file on the local Mac client where it will be installed.

To install the client, complete the following steps:

1.
Expand the downloaded installation file by double-clicking it.

2.
Go to the Mac desktop and open the Remote Desktop Connection volume. Copy the Remote Desktop Connection folder into the local disk of the Mac client.

3.
Remove the Remote Desktop Connection volume and the original installation file by placing them in the Desktop Trashcan.

4.
Launch the Remote Desktop Connection from the Remote Desktop Folder, and enter the name of the system to which you are connecting. Click Connect to establish the remote connection.

5.
When prompted, enter the name and password of the account you configured to allow remote access to this desktop system.

2. Understanding Other Non-Windows Client Access Methods

In addition to the Mac operating systems, Exchange 2007 can support a variety of clients by using virtual machines on the Mac client and leveraging support for IMAP, SMTP, and POP. Using these protocols, Exchange administrators can provide limited email functionality and support a variety of clients throughout the Exchange environment for email and communication purposes.

Virtual PC Access to Exchange

Most effective for users who are familiar with operating and working within Windows PC–based operating systems, the Virtual PC for Mac provides the same full functioning of a Windows PC client on the Mac OS desktop. Using this option allows Mac users who are comfortable working in Windows Microsoft Office and Outlook applications the ability to use a Microsoft client from the Mac. Running within a virtual machine, a Windows domain client PC can allow the same features to a Mac desktop as any Windows domain client.

With a virtual PC machine, the latest version of Outlook for Windows can be used on the Mac client desktop, accessing Exchange 2007 data with full Windows-based support in areas such as offline files, multiple profiles, and Windows domain network resources. For more information regarding Virtual PC, go to the Mactopia web page: http://www.microsoft.com/mac/products/virtualpc/virtualpc.aspx?pid=virtualpc.

POP3 Access to Exchange

POP3 is one of the most popular methods of providing mail services on the Internet today. POP is highly reliable but has limited functionality. Users who access email using POP3 are limited to downloading all messages to the local client and can only send and receive messages when a connection is established with the POP server.

Unlike previous versions of Exchange that supported POP3 from the GUI, Exchange 2007 does not have a GUI option within the Exchange Management Console to enable POP3 support. Configuration of a user client in Exchange 2007 requires the use of the Exchange Management Shell. The script to enable a user’s mailbox to support POP3 is as follows:

set-CASMailbox testmbx -PopEnabled:$True

where testmbx is the name of the mailbox being enabled for POP3 support.

When enabled with Exchange 2007, POP can be leveraged to provide email support to additional non-Windows–based clients’ platforms. Through the common method of sending mail, multiple client platforms can communicate over email regardless of the actual desktop operating system and client mail software being used.

The POP3 functionality of Exchange Server 2007 can support multiclient environments, including the Eudora Mail client, the Netscape Mail client, and other POP-compatible nonspecific client platforms. This protocol is best used when supporting single-client systems that download mail and store mail information locally.

IMAP Access to Exchange

As covered in the section “Mac OS X Mail,” IMAP is a fully supported method that allows access from non-Windows–based client systems to access Exchange 2007 information. Designed to allow access to Information Stores located on a remote system, IMAP can also be used to support the Linux-based Netscape Mail clients.

Using the Netscape Mail client, Netscape users can access, collaborate, and store information on the Exchange 2007 server with the IMAP support built in to Netscape Communicator. With this functionality, networks can now incorporate additional operating systems, such as Linux with Netscape Mail, and still support email functionality between all network users.

Use the Preferences option on the Netscape Mail client to configure and enable support for IMAP communication with Exchange 2007.

Windows Mobile/Pocket PC Access

Client mobile access is now fully integrated and supported when the Exchange 2007 server is installed. Remote and mobile users can use the Outlook Mobile version to send, receive, and synchronize mail, calendaring, and task information, using the Windows Mobile and Pocket PC platform over mobile information services built in to Exchange 2007.

HTML Access

Another feature with Exchange 2007 is HTML access. With this feature, administrators can use Internet-ready cellular telephones to provide HTML access to Exchange information for mobile users regardless of where they might be.

By providing additional mobile services and client permissions through Active Directory, alternate access can be granted to email and Exchange using Internet-ready mobile phone devices over HTML access.

Outlook Web Access

Another very effective method of allowing access to Exchange information is OWA. Enhanced greatly in Exchange 2007, OWA can be used to provide HTML browser access to Exchange mailboxes from inside the network and from the Internet.

Probably the biggest benefit to using the OWA solution to support non-Windows–based clients is that it is nondiscretionary as to which type of Internet browser can be used to access it. Effective in functionality just like the full Outlook client, Linux-based users and others using non-Windows–based systems can access OWA for email and calendar management in the same fashion as any Windows-based users.


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