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Exchange Server 2010 : Managing Web and Mobile Access (part 1) - Enabling and Disabling Outlook Web App Features, Configuring Ports, IP Addresses, and Host Names Used by Web Sites

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7/21/2013 7:23:11 PM

When you install the Client Access server role on an Exchange server, Outlook Web App and Exchange ActiveSync are automatically configured for use. This makes them fairly easy to manage, but there are some essential concepts you need to know to manage these implementations more effectively. This section explains these concepts.

1. Using Outlook Web App and Exchange ActiveSync with IIS

IIS handles incoming requests to a Web site within the context of a Web application. A Web application is a software program that delivers content to users over HTTP or HTTPS. Each Web site has a default Web application and one or more additional Web applications associated with it. The default Web application handles incoming requests that you haven't assigned to other Web applications. Additional Web applications handle incoming requests that specifically reference the application.

When you install a Client Access server, virtual directories and Web applications are installed to support various Exchange services. Each Web application must have a root virtual directory associated with it. The root virtual directory sets the application's name and maps the application to the physical directory that contains the application's content. Typically, the default Web application is associated with the root virtual directory of the Web site and any additional virtual directories you've created but haven't mapped to other applications.

In the default configuration, the default application handles an incoming request for the / directory of a Web site as well as other named virtual directories. IIS maps references to / and other virtual directories to the physical directory that contains the related content. For the / directory of the default Web site, the default physical directory is %SystemRoot%/inetpub/wwwroot.

In most cases, you only need to open port 443 on your organization's firewall to allow users to access Exchange data hosted by IIS. Then you simply tell users the Uniform Resource Locator (URL) that they need to type in their browser's Address field or in their smart phone's browser. Users can then access Outlook Web App or Exchange ActiveSync when they're off-site. The URLs for Outlook Web App and Exchange ActiveSync are different. The Outlook Web App URL is https://yourserver.yourdomain.com/owa, and the Exchange ActiveSync URL is https://yourserver.yourdomain.com/Microsoft-Server-ActiveSync. Generally, however, the address users enter for both matches the OWA address.

You can configure Outlook Web App and Exchange ActiveSync for single-server and multi-server environments. In a single-server environment, you use one Client Access server for all your Web and mobile access needs. In a multiple server environment, you could instruct users to access different URLs to access different Client Access servers, or you could use a technique such as Round Robin Domain Name System (DNS) to load-balance between multiple servers automatically while giving all users the same access URLs. However, for optimal scalability and availability, you should configure a Client Access server (CAS) array and then use a software or hardware load balancer.

You can use Outlook Web App and Exchange ActiveSync with firewalls. You configure your network to use a perimeter network with firewalls in front of the designated Client Access servers and then open port 443 to your Client Access servers or to the URL for the CAS array.

2. Working with Virtual Directories and Web Applications

When you install a Client Access server, Exchange Setup installs and configures virtual directories and Web applications for use. The virtual directories and Web applications allow authenticated users to access their messaging data from the Web. In the Exchange Management Shell, you can use the Get-OWAVirtualDirectory cmdlet to view information about OWA virtual directories, the New-OWAVirtualDirectory cmdlet to create an OWA directory if one does not exist, the Remove-OWAVirtualDirectory cmdlet to remove an OWA directory, and the Test-OWAConnectivity cmdlet to test OWA connectivity. There are similar sets of commands for ActiveSync, Autodiscover, ECP, OAB, Windows PowerShell, and Web services. If you examine the virtual directory structure for the default Web site, you'll find several important virtual directories and Web applications, including

  • Autodiscover Autodiscover is used to provide the Autodiscover service for all clients. By default, this directory is configured for anonymous authentication and integrated Windows authentication.

  • ECP The Exchange Control Panel (ECP) is used for Web-based administration of Exchange and end-user self-service. By default, this directory is configured for anonymous authentication and basic authentication.

  • EWS Exchange Web Services (EWS) is used to enable applications to interact with Exchange mailboxes and messaging items using HTTPS. By default, this directory is configured for anonymous authentication and basic authentication.

  • Microsoft-Server-ActiveSync Microsoft-Server-ActiveSync is the directory to which Exchange ActiveSync users connect to access their Exchange data. By default, this virtual directory is configured for Basic authentication.

  • OAB OAB is the directory that provides the offline address book (OAB) to clients. By default, this directory is configured for integrated Windows authentication.

  • OWA OWA is the directory to which users connect with their Web browsers to start an Outlook Web App session. By default, this directory is configured for basic authentication.

  • PowerShell PowerShell is the directory to which the Exchange Management tools connect for remote administration. By default, this directory is configured for anonymous authentication.

  • Public Public is the directory to which users connect to access the default Public Folders tree. By default, this directory is configured for both basic and integrated Windows authentication, with the default domain set to the pre–Windows 2000 domain name, such as ADATUM.

This section examines key tasks that you use to manage IIS, virtual directories, and Web applications.

3. Enabling and Disabling Outlook Web App Features

Microsoft uses the term segmentation to refer to your ability to enable and disable the various features within Outlook Web App. Segmentation settings applied to the OWA virtual directory on Client Access servers control the features available to users. If a server has multiple OWA virtual directories or you have multiple Client Access servers, you must configure each directory and server separately. Table 1 provides a summary of the segmentation features that are enabled by default for use with Outlook Web App.

Table 1. An Overview of Segmentation Features

FEATURE

WHEN THIS FEATURE IS ENABLED, USERS CAN

All Address Lists

View all the available address lists. When this feature is disabled, users can view only the default global address list.

Calendar

Access their calendars in Outlook Web App.

Change Password

Change their passwords in Outlook Web App.

Contacts

Access their contacts in Outlook Web App.

E-Mail Signature

Customize their signatures and include a signature in outgoing messages.

Exchange ActiveSync Integration

Remove mobile devices, initiate mobile wipe, view their device passwords, and review their mobile access logs.

Instant Messaging

Access Instant Messaging in Outlook Web App.

Journal

Access their journals in Outlook Web App.

Junk E-Mail Filtering

Filter junk e-mail using Outlook Web App.

Notes

Access their notes in Outlook Web App.

Premium Client

Use Premium features if users have a Premium access license. Otherwise, a client can use only OWA light.

Public Folders

Browse and read items in public folders using Outlook Web App.

Recover Deleted Items

View items that have been deleted from Deleted Items and choose whether to recover them.

Reminders And Notifications

Receive new e-mail notifications, task reminders, calendar reminders, and automatic folder updates.

Rules

Customize rules in Outlook Web App.

S/MIME

Download the S/MIME control and use it to read and compose signed and encrypted messages (Internet Explorer only).

Search Folders

Access their Search folders in Outlook Web App.

Spelling Checker

Access the spelling checker in Outlook Web App.

Tasks

Access their tasks in Outlook Web App.

Text Messaging

Send and receive text messages in Outlook Web App.

Theme Selection

Change the color scheme in Outlook Web App.

Unified Messaging Integration

Access their voice mail and faxes in Outlook Web App. They can also configure voice mail options.

You can enable or disable segmentation features by completing the following steps:

  1. In the Exchange Management Console, expand the Server Configuration node, and then select the Client Access node.

  2. In the upper portion of the details pane, you'll see a list of your organization's Client Access servers. Select the server you want to configure, as shown in Figure 1.

    Select the Client Access server with which you want to work.

    Figure 1. Select the Client Access server with which you want to work.

  3. In the lower portion of the details pane, you'll see a list of option tabs for the selected server. On the Outlook Web App tab, right-click the virtual directory for which you want to implement segmentation, and then select Properties. Typically, you'll want to configure the OWA virtual directory on the Default Web Site, as this directory is used by default for Outlook Web App.

  4. On the Segmentation tab, select a feature you want to enable or disable. Click Enable to enable the feature. Click Disable to disable the feature. Click OK.

In the Exchange Management Shell, you can enable or disable segmentation features using the Set-OWAVirtualDirectory cmdlet. To enable or disable these features for individual users, use the Set-CASMailbox cmdlet.

4. Configuring Ports, IP Addresses, and Host Names Used by Web Sites

Each Web site hosted by IIS has one or more bindings. A binding is a unique combination of ports, IP addresses, and host names that identifies a Web site. For unsecure connections, the default port is TCP port 80. For secure connections, the default port is TCP port 443. The default IP address setting is to use any available IP address. The default host name is the Client Access server's DNS name.

Normally, you won't want to multihome a Client Access server. However, when the server is multihomed, or when you use it to provide Outlook Web App or Exchange ActiveSync services for multiple domains, the default configuration isn't ideal. On a multihomed server, you'll usually want messaging protocols to respond only on a specific IP address. To do this, you need to change the default settings. On a server that provides Outlook Web App and Exchange ActiveSync services for multiple domains, you'll usually want to specify an additional host name for each domain.

When you are working with IIS 7.0 or IIS 7.5, you can change the identity of a Web site by completing the following steps:

  1. If you want the Web site to use a new IP address, you must configure the IP address before trying to specify it on the Web site.

  2. Start IIS Manager. Click Start, point to Programs or All Programs as appropriate, point to Administrative Tools, and select Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager.

    Note

    By default, IIS Manager connects to the services running on the local computer. If you want to connect to a different server, select the Start Page node in the left pane and then click the Connect to a Server link. This starts the Connect To Server Wizard. Follow the prompts to connect to the remote server.

  3. In IIS Manager, double-click the entry for the server with which you want to work, and then double-click Sites.

  4. In the left pane, select the Web site that you want to manage, and then select Bindings on the Actions pane.

  5. As Figure 2 shows, you can now use the Site Bindings dialog box to configure multiple bindings for the Web site.

    You can use the Site Bindings dialog box to configure multiple bindings for the Web site.

    Figure 2. You can use the Site Bindings dialog box to configure multiple bindings for the Web site.

  6. Use the Site Bindings dialog box to manage the site's bindings by using the following settings:

    • Add Adds a new identity. To add a new identity, click Add. In the Add Site Binding dialog box, select the binding type, IP address, and TCP port to use. Optionally, type a host header name or select an Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificate as appropriate for the binding type. Click OK when you have finished.

    • Edit Allows you to edit the currently selected identity. To edit an identity, click the identity, and then click Edit. In the Edit Site Binding dialog box, select an IP address and TCP port to use. Optionally, type a host header name or select an SSL certificate as appropriate for the binding type. Click OK when you have finished.

    • Remove Allows you to remove the currently selected identity. To remove an identity, click the identity, and then click Remove. When prompted to confirm, click Yes.

    • Browse Allows you to test an identity. To test an identity, click the identity, and then click Browse. IIS Manager then opens a browser window and connects to the selected binding.

  7. Click OK twice.

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